How To Design a Website for Better Search Engine Ranking

How To Design a Website for Better Search Engine Ranking

I’m asked about this quite frequently. It’s this question about how to design a website and ensure it’s set up for the best possible search engine ranking. Because being found on search engines can make or break your online success. So it’s not just a question about ranking high for a certain keyword. It’s about ranking high for the best keywords to drive results.

Before we dig into the details, it’s important to understand that search engine optimization (SEO) success is dependent on two factors. The first factor is on-site design and setup. This has to do with the structure and mapping of pages on your site, the content you offer, and several behind-the-scenes settings. The second factor is off-site promotion. This has more to do with link building and gaining outside credibility for your website. Our focus here today will be with the first of these two factors, on-site design.

The Background

A few years ago, some friends started a new laser engraving business. As they were kicking things off, they knew that the website was going to be a key piece of their strategy. So we got together and built a site around their main keyword of laser engraving. The site did well in ranking for that phrase, and it helped generate several new customers for them.

Over time, the business continued to grow, and the owners gained a better understanding of their niche. Most of the work they are doing falls into two main categories. One type of customer they get is business and corporate accounts looking to get logos engraved onto other products as promotional giveaways. The other type of customer is looking for personalization on keepsake items, such as wedding party gifts.

As they began to expand and focus on those two categories, they also felt like it was time for the website to evolve with them. The good news is that the website was rock solid with terms related to laser engraving. However, it wasn’t anywhere on the radar for terms related to these two categories. The new design would need to capitalize on these niche categories.

Keyword Research (Where a Good SEO Strategy Begins)

When we set out to design a website for search engine ranking, the first thing we need to do is keyword research. I’m a firm believer in following what the data tells me. I never arbitrarily pick a keyword phrase out of a hat and build a website.

We targeted three keyword phrases in order to show up in searches for the best possible audience.

  • laser engraving (already ranking well locally for this, and didn’t want to lose it)
  • promotional products
  • personalized gifts

We selected these phrases after evaluating dozens of options and alternatives in Google’s Keyword Planner tool. When doing this for a local business, it’s helpful to filter results geographically. For example, you don’t want to use soda in an area where it’s more commonly called pop. Filtering geographically will get you the terms people actually use in your area to find what you’re offering. Beyond that, it’s all about finding the terms that have the highest search volume. And it’s a bonus if they have low competition. These terms present the greatest opportunities to capture visitors.

How To Design a Website for Results

Search engines are looking for authority. They want to ensure that the pages they send searchers to are the most helpful resources available. Old SEO methods of keyword stuffing pages just don’t do the trick anymore. So you need to show value. One of the best ways to show value (and authority) is through strong content. And long-form content typically shows higher authority than a few short blurbs. Therefore we built three high-authority pages mapped out like this:

  • Homepage (main keyword: laser engraving) – Our target for the homepage is 1500 words of content. Within that content, we have sections with short summaries for the other target keyword phrases. And then we added other general information about laser engraving.
  • Authority page (keyword: promotional products) – The target for other authority pages is at least 800 words of content. We used similar keywords, such as promotional items and custom logo engraving, but the main focus was on primary term.
  • Authority page (keyword: personalized gifts) – This page has the same 800-word target and used other supporting key phrases like anniversary gifts and personalized wedding gifts.

The new website structure focuses primarily on these three pages. Other existing pages aren’t removed. However, the more we can focus on core navigation for these three pages, the better. Therefore, we add the new authority pages to the header menu and link to them from the homepage. Likewise, the authority pages link to each other and back to the homepage.

Back-End Tactics to Improve Search Engine Ranking

Strong SEO writing is an important part of this process. Additionally, there are some other back-end pieces that to take care of. It’s things like creating strong snippets (using Yoast SEO) that can make a big difference. Not only should a snippet contain your keywords, but it also needs a strong call-to-action.

In addition to this kind of metadata, we make sure other elements are properly addressed:

  • Content readability – Yoast SEO does a great job scoring the page content for this. And I like to run all of my content through Hemingway App to help me find and correct difficult to read sentences, passive voice, and other readability factors.
  • Link balance – Every page should have links to other internal (your site) pages, but also external links to other websites. Don’t overdo it, but make sure the page’s links are strong and add value.
  • XML sitemap considerations – Static pages on the site that provide authority should be set to a high priority for the search engine bots. Additionally, less important pages (like your contact page, etc) should be bumped down in priority or removed from indexing altogether. This helps tell the search engines to determine what content is really important on the website.

Beyond this, if you have green lights from Yoast SEO on readability and SEO, then you should be all set.

The Results

Before this redesign work on the website, laser engraving was already performing well for us in local searches. Usually in the top three, and sometimes number one. The site was not ranking at all for the terms promotional products or personalized gifts. Once Google’s bots got to index the new site changes, we noticed some nice results. The homepage now seems to have a pretty strong hold on the #1 spot for laser engraving locally. And local searches for the other terms are now ranking the website in the top five!

Promotional products is currently ranking the homepage at #5…

how to design a website, search engine ranking

Personalized gifts is performing even better with TWO pages ranking in the top five! Here you see that not only did the homepage rank for this term, but so did the authority page…

how to design a website, search engine ranking

Other Considerations

These results were achieved without any other external SEO work. Simple, yet strong design strategy resulted in major improvements in search engine rankings.

At the same time, there are a few other tactics which could support (or even improve) strong results like this:

  • Link building and other off-site SEO promotion – Building a good portfolio of links pointing back to all of these pages could continue to enhance their credibility.
  • Content marketing strategy – Producing fresh and relevant content using related keyword terms can strengthen on-site authority.
  • Social media marketing – Providing social proof for these pages by sharing them regularly on social media sends strong signals to the search engines.

There’s definitely a strategy to follow if you want to build a website for great search engine ranking. And the key really is to think through all of the elements of the design and don’t skip some for convenience. If you do a good job with all of this, you’ll see the payoff in increased visibility (and traffic).

How To Increase Google Traffic By 48% (A Local SEO Case Study)

How To Increase Google Traffic By 48% (A Local SEO Case Study)

google traffic, local seo, small business

Winning in local SEO isn’t about doing some magic trick and spiking yourself up to number one overnight. Remember the story about the tortoise and the hare? The idea is simple. Keep doing the right things consistently over time, and you’ll win. You can increase your organic (not paid ad) Google traffic over time by consistently focusing on a few key tactics.

That’s what happened last year with one local business we work with. And I’ll be honest with you. I didn’t have much hope for them at times through this process.

If you understand SEO, then you know there are internal and external factors that impact your rankings. Internal factors might include having a strong, user-friendly website design and authoritative content in your area of expertise. External factors deal with off-site issues like having a strong backlink strategy. In order to do really well, both of these areas need to be handled well.

What We Could Have Done Better

It was a year of transition for this local business. Over the course of the year, there were three different Marketing leads to work with. The transitions meant different ideas coming to the table regularly, and a need to move slowly on big changes. For us, that meant we weren’t able to pull the trigger on some bigger website changes we felt needed to get done. In particular, it would have helped our SEO chances greatly if we were able to:

  • Update the look and feel of the site to a more modern design
  • Restructure and streamline the site for user experience and a strong sitemap
  • Bulk up thin content pages to show greater authority

The good news is that it looks like we may be giving these things more attention this year. With this stuff not running optimally, we saw improvements in Google traffic, but not as much as we could have.

The Improvement We Saw In Google Traffic

In 2015, organic search produced 4,333 first-time visitors to the website. In 2016, that number was 6,446 first-time visitors. That’s an increase of over 2,100 more people (48.77%) coming through their (virtual) doors!

google traffic, local seo, search engine optimization

This chart might not look overwhelming, but remember the tortoise and the hare? Each month this year (blue bar) represents an increase anywhere from 110 to 280 more new visitors per month than the previous year (orange bar). It represents steady, consistent work resulting in steady, consistent results.

What We Did To Get These Results

Early in the year, we did some initial cleanup and link building, which gave us a bit of a boost out of the gate. Internally, there was some cleaning up of meta descriptions (the snippets you see in search results), and other optimization. Externally, we did multiple tiers of link building and social bookmarking. That all gave us a good start, but the real story is in the consistency throughout the year. Here’s what we did, and all within a budget of less than $400/mo:

  • Backlink Cleanup – Before we got into building our (good) backlink portfolio, we first needed to get rid of any old backlinks that were hurting us. We were able to uncover several links that held us down and get rid of them (as far as Google is concerned).
  • Creating Social Signals – We have a way to sort of mimic the effect that celebrity social media accounts can have when they share something. These social signals usually have a quick impact by showing the search engines that something on your site is of high social value.
  • Contextual Links with Guest Posting – The idea here is to get authoritative websites to write an article about a subject related to you and include a link in the article back to your website. The higher authority of the website, the higher value of the link back to you.
  • Advanced Crowdsearch – This is a strategic way of creating some of the other signals search engines look at to determine the value of your site (and its content). When search engines see the value, they bump you up in the rankings.

After the backlink cleanup, we just put the other three items on a three-month rotation. Each month we would do just one of them, and target it at the homepage of the website. After we worked through all three of them over a three-month period, we would start over.

Consistency is the Key

It’s also important to note that if the budget allowed for us to do two or three of these things every month, the results we saw would be greatly magnified. You get out of it what you put into it. But more importantly, the key is in the consistency.

Doing the right things regularly paid off by generating more Google traffic to the website. And if we’re doing our job well on the website, then we’ll be converting those visits into sales leads and then into customers. More on that idea some other time…

Why We Love A/B Split Testing (And You Should, Too!)

Why We Love A/B Split Testing (And You Should, Too!)

AGood website design and management is not based on feelings or personal preferences. Rather it’s based on data and facts that move you closer to your goals. That’s why I love A/B split testing. It’s all about figuring out the correct path for your design based on hard data.

If you’re serious about measuring the ROI of a website, then A/B split testing will help you work towards the best design by allowing you to test different options against each other to discover which is the higher performing design. You start by picking a key conversion metric (like a buy button, a sign-up button, or some other call-to-action or metric), and designing two (or more) versions of the page. Visitors to the page can be randomly served one page or the other, and the tracking tools will measure how often your desired conversion happens on each page. Once you determine a winner, then you can direct all traffic to the final, higher-performing page.

You should also consider incremental design using A/B split testing. Once your initial experiment is complete, you can try again with the same page by changing another element, allowing you to continue improving the page’s performance over time.

There are many tools available to help you with A/B split testing. But everything you need to run a split test experiment is available for free in Google Analytics. Here’s what you need to do to set up your own experiments:

Step 1: Decide What You Want to Measure

The first thing you’ll need to do is to determine what you want to measure. Is it a site metric like pages per visit, or length of time on site? Or is it getting to a specific page like a sign-up form, or a purchase “thank you” page?

As you define your desired outcomes, you’ll need to create multiple versions of the web pages you plan to test hoping to achieve that outcome. Each of these two (or more) pages will have something different in their design. While you can test two pages with completely different designs, it’s best to test smaller elements of similarly designed pages. Test things like placement of the call-to-action on the page, or the colors of sign-up forms, or the wording used in the header text on the page, or whatever other option you want to test. Whatever it is, create the pages with your desired outcome in mind and how you think you can improve conversion rates with your page variation(s).

Once you have your split test pages created, you’ll be able to set up the goals you’ll need to measure their success.

Step 2: Create Goals in Google Analytics

Once you know what it is you want to measure, then you’ll need to set up the Goals so that Google Analytics can track the conversion rate on those events. Goals are good to track regardless, but you’ll need specific goals to use for your split test experiment. Here’s how you set those up in GA:

  1. split testing, google analyticsGo to the Admin tab in Google Analytics
  2. Select the profile you want to add your goal to
  3. Click on the ‘Goals’ tab
  4. Click the ‘+ New Goal’ button
  5. Select the option for either an existing template or a custom setup (most likely a template)
  6. Complete the Goal Description by giving it a name and selecting the type
  7. Complete the Goal Details with the desired outcome/values for your goal type
  8. Click ‘Save’

Once your goals are set up, then you’ll be able to create your split test experiment.

Step 3: Create Your Split Test Experiment in Google Analytics

At this point, you should have two (or more) versions of a web page you’ll be testing, and at least one goal you’ll be using to track and compare the pages. With that you’ll be able to set up your split test experiment in Google Analytics.

  1. split-testing-experimentGo to the Reporting tab in Google analytics
  2. Select ‘Experiments’ in the ‘Bahvior’ menu
  3. Click the ‘Create experiment’ button
  4. Set name and objective for the experiment
  5. Configure your experiment with the original page and variations
  6. Insert your experiment code immediately after the head tag for the original page in your test (Google Content Experiments plugin)
  7. Review and start your experiment

Your experiment will run for a period of time (Google defaults it to 30 days) tracking the goal conversion as it sends visitors randomly to the original page and each variation. After your experiment has run for a sufficient amount of time, you’ll be able to determine a winner.

Step 4: Determine the Winner and Repeat as Needed

Once you determine a winner, then you can direct all traffic to the winning page. Now you can be confident that you’ll be getting the better conversion rate for your goals. At this point you can leave it alone, or try another change on the page. The beauty of incremental design using A/B split testing is that you can constantly be working towards better conversions. The result will never take you backward. If you try another split test, and your new “B” page does not perform better than your “A”, then you keep the existing “A” page. And when a new “B” page out-performs your “A” page, then it takes over as your new “A” page for the next test.

I recently worked with a client on a split test for the highest traffic page on their website (it gets more traffic than the homepage). The problem with the page was that it also had a high bounce rate. So we knew it was effective in getting people TO the website, but not with KEEPING them there. We reviewed the page and rebuilt it with a cleaner design and a nice call-to-action at the top of the page to encourage click-through to another page for more information (lowering that bounce rate). With the newer, much fancier design, we were certain the new variation would be a big hit with visitors.

Much to our surprise, the split test experiment showed that the original not only out-performed our awesome new design, but it beat it pretty decisively. That was a great reminder for me that I should never base design on feelings or personal preferences. Data shows the real impacts.

Use the data available to you effectively, and you’ll reap the rewards of a high-performing website.

 

Note: This post was originally published on the MainWP Blog.

 

9 Tips to Dominate Local SEO for Small Business

9 Tips to Dominate Local SEO for Small Business

local seo, search engine optimizationThe internet of today is competitive, and having a strong local SEO strategy is a necessity for small businesses. Most business owners know the difficulty of remaining competitive online, but they don’t know where to start. Small businesses owners should consider these local SEO optimization tips.

Stay Compliant With Google Updates

Google rolled out their latest update in September 2016, and it encourages business owners to provide a more useful, relevant experience for searchers. The Penguin update lists a few strategies that can help business owners push their sites to the top of local rankings. Some factors revealed in the Penguin update include domain authority, on-page optimization, and the physical address of businesses.

Create Pages for Local Listings

Another effective strategy is to build local listing pages on directories such as Google+, Yelp, and Foursquare (just to name a few). Business owners should create profiles on these directory sites and claim site ownership. From there, the owner should ensure the accuracy and consistency of the listings. By listing the website on these directories, business owners can rise through local listings.

Sign Up for Your Google My Business Page

By signing up for Google’s My Business, a local business owner can make his or her site more visible on Google+, Search, Maps, and Google Local. When the site owner signs into this service, they can enter or update the business’ address and contact information, and they can also access other apps such as Reviews, Insights, Analytics, and Hangouts. The business search service can be accessed via desktop browser or mobile app, and the app provides notifications when someone reviews the site on Google+.

Add a Blog Page to the Business Website

Putting a blog page on the company website will help the owner improve the site’s visibility. The more posts you publish, the more visitors will come to the site. Writing blog posts allows business owners to target locally-relevant search terms and keywords, and these posts can keep visitors on the site once they’re there. The longer a visitor stays on the site, the more likely they are to turn into a customer. Relevant, engaging blog content reduces bounce rates, which are an important measurement of the site’s search engine ranking.

Optimize Your Site for Mobile Devices

Optimizing a site for mobile users is another important way to improve its search engine rankings. With each Google algorithm update, mobile optimization becomes more important. Updates prioritize sites that display well on smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices, and these sites rank higher in mobile search results.

Ask Visitors for Positive Reviews

Google gives great importance to online reviews during site rankings. Good reviews build trust in a site and enhance credibility, and that’s why it is important for business owners to gather positive reviews from customers. Owners can increase the likelihood of customer endorsement with emails listing all the major review sites such as Google Places and asking for their input on products and services.

Create Engaging Content

With each algorithm update, it becomes increasingly important to have site content that offers users something of value. It’s quite easy to create engaging, valuable site content. All the business owner has to do is determine customers’ concerns and write content that attempts to resolve them. By solving a reader’s specific problem, a business owner can enrich that customer’s online experience.

Create and Maintain Social Media Pages

Building a solid presence on sites like LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Twitter is critical for a business owner who wants high search engine rankings. Social media also has indirect effects on site rankings. When a company’s fan base increases, more people visit the site. Search engines take site popularity cues from search results, and increased traffic can boost the site’s rankings.

Improve the User Experience

Business owners should focus on an improved user experience (UX) by making sites easy to navigate. Clear layouts, appealing designs, and easy-to-find contact info can go a long way toward a better UX, and these factors can encourage visitors to remain on the site longer. When visitors stick around, conversion and bounce rates improve, and it boosts the site’s search engine ranking.

To dominate search rankings, site owners should regularly update site content. This helps sites in two main ways. First, regular updates keep customers coming back to see what’s new. Second, Google’s algorithm updates tend to favor sites that frequently post new content. By following the tips listed here, business owners can improve their local SEO.

 

P.S. Learn more about our search engine optimization (SEO) services, and drive more traffic to your site.

how to share your blog posts on social media like a boss

how to share your blog posts on social media like a boss

share blog postsIf blogging had a secret sauce or magic potion, this would be it. By far, this is the most common question I get asked about blogging and social media.

When is right time to share blog posts on social media?

I can confidently respond without hesitation…

It depends.

I’ll be honest. I really wish I could tell you an exact formula for sharing your (amazing) blog posts so they reach the millions of people who need to be reading them. But the reality is that there isn’t a formula.

With that said, there are some things you can do that’ll help you figure it out. With a little bit of testing, measuring, and retesting, you’ll find the right answer for you pretty quickly. In no time at all, you’ll be able to share blog posts like a boss.

The First Key to Social Media Success

It’s not about you.

First and foremost, the success of your blog posts in the world of social media has nothing to do with you. Well, maybe a little bit. Many bloggers misunderstand social media success as having to do with getting the right mix with when and how they post their content. However, if it only depended on your sharing, then it’s not really social is it?

If you want to find success in social media, then you need to be thinking about how other people share your content. Your role in that is two-fold:

  1. Create content that’s share-worthy. Think about blog post titles that make readers want to click. Think about eye-popping images that catch their attention. Think about writing content that would make them want to share with their friends because of how it moved them.
  2. Make it easy for them to share. I’m amazed at how many websites I visit where I can’t find social sharingbuttons. Sure, I could copy/paste the blog post URL, but if I have to go to that much effort, you’ve already lost me. Share buttons should be highly visible and easy to use.

Finding the Right Times

While most of your success comes from how other people share your content, you’ll still want to optimize how you share your blog posts for maixmum reach. This is where you’ll want to experiment with different types of posts (text, images, links, and videos) at different times of day.

Social media gurus will look at the data and tell you that you should be posting your content at 2pm on Thursday afternoons (or some other flavor of the month). However, that’s based on meta-data from thousands of accounts, not your data.

So how do you find the optimum times for your accounts?

For Facebook

If you run a Facebook page for your website, then you’ll have access to Insights for your page.

facebook-insights

In your Insights, you’ll find “When Your Fans Are Online” on the Posts tab. The initial chart shows general population volume, but when you mouse over different days of the week you’ll see when your fans are online that day. This is based on recent data specific to the people who are fans of your page. Note that when your followers are online will vary from day to day.

facebook, best time to post

For Twitter

You can find similar data for Twitter using third-party tools, like Follwerwonk. Once you sign in with your Twitter account, you’ll be able to analyze followers… both those who follow you, and those who you follow. You’ll get a great deal of demographic information about your followers, and a detailed chart of when they are most active on Twitter.

twitter, analyze followers

I want to draw special attention to that “Schedule at Buffer” button below the top chart. That brings me to my next point…

Buffering Your Way to Success

Once you’ve figured out the best times to schedule your posts, then you can plug that information into a tool like Buffer. In Buffer you’ll be able to create a custom schedule for each of your social media profiles, and set the times you want to post. You can even schedule different frequency and posting times for each day of the week. In the example below, you’ll see that I set my schedule to reflect the peak times for my Facebook page on Tuesdays.

buffer, scheduling posts

This is where that “Schedule at Buffer” button in Followerwonk comes in handy. You can select a frequency for scheduled posts in a day, and automatically import an optimum posting schedule into Buffer.

One of my favorite parts of Buffer is the analytics for the posts you share (only through Buffer). Based on interaction threshholds, you’ll get a good idea of what kinds of social media posts are resonating the most with your audience.

buffer analytics

It’s important to note here that using Buffer for scheduled posts doesn’t mean that everything you do on social media needs to be scheduled through Buffer. It is, however, a great tool that will help you push your blog posts out to different platforms at predetermined times, making sharing much simpler.

CoSchedule: A Premium Solution

If your blog is on (self-hosted) WordPress, then you can use some cool tools like CoSchedule. This WordPress plugin comes with a small monthly fee, but it has some pretty slick scheduling functionality. Basically, while you in your Edit Post mode, you can also create your social media posts to publish at whatever times you specify. Create, text, image, and link posts to run at the same time that your blog posts publishes. And then run a different kind of social media post at x-number of hours after the blog post publishes.

coschedule

If you publish your blog post at 6am, you can publish a link post to Facebook at 6am, then an image post 5 hours later, and a text post 10 hours later. Then think about the Twitter and Google+ posts you want to send out in order to get the best coverage for when your followers are most likely to see it. Everything is triggered automatically based on the publishing of the blog post. CoSchedule even has a slick calendar that shows you all scheduled blog and social media posts for easy management.

Last thought…

The best thing you can do to determine what social media posting methods and schedules are best for you is to test, measure, adjust, and test again. When you share blog posts, pay attention to the types of social media posts you run at different times, and how well each of those resonate with your followers. Before long, you should be able to pick up on some trends and patterns with your followers that will help you optimize everypost you make…

Like a boss.

 

Note: This post was originally published on the Allume Blog.

Connecting Well with Facebook Audience Optimization

Connecting Well with Facebook Audience Optimization

With all of the talk about how Facebook is changing algorithms to push down your page’s posts, there’s finally something to look forward to! It’s called Facebook Audience Optimization, and it’s a new tool which allows Facebook Page publishers to better target the audience for each post, making it more likely that your content will be seen by the people who really want to see it.

But why not show all of your posts to all the people? Well, that’s not great marketing, to be honest. Remember:

That’s where Audience Optimization comes in. It allows you to tag a preferred audience who is most likely to be interested, or remove those who are least likely to be interested with audience restrictions. And it will give you audience insights to help you understand which interest tags are having the greatest impact with viewers of the posts.

Getting Started with Facebook Audience Optimization

Before you can use Audience Optimization on your Facebook Page, it must be allowed via your Page settings. To enable this feature, go to Settings > General > Audience Optimization for Posts, check the box to allow the feature, and click on the Save Changes button.

facebook audience optimization

Once the feature is enabled, then you’ll be able to use Audience Optimization when creating posts on your Facebook Page by clicking on the targeting icon.

facebook-audience-optimization-posting

This will open the tool which allows you to select your preferred audience and/or audience restrictions.

facebook audience optimization

Getting the Most Out of Facebook Audience Optimization

When using a tool like this, it’s worth mentioning that you’ll need to think first about how people consume your content, not just who you want to get your content in front of. There may be some people who you believe need to see your post, but if they don’t want to see it, then your efforts will not produce the engagement needed to lift it in Facebook’s algorithms. So target the audience who is most likely to like, comment, and (most importantly) click.

Facebook suggests several tips for tagging your posts, including the following:

  • Target audiences with relevant tags – What matters most? Think about the interests which are most relevant to that post.
  • Tag with a mix of broad and narrow terms – “…think about the classic “who, what, where, when, why and how” elements of the story as a starting place.”
  • Think associatively about related interests – Which topics or interests overlap the main ideas you’re tagging in the post?
  • Consider including organizations and brands – This is also about finding the overlap in interests.
  • Use tags with small audiences strategically – It’s not always about reaching LOTS of people, but finding the people who will be most passionate about your content.

Getting your content in front of the right people can pay huge dividends for your blog/website. And using a tool like Audience Optimization can help your content get the right kind of reach. Despite what many may believe, Facebook relies on your content. The idea that they are pushing it down is more about them getting the right pieces of content they believe people want to see in front of them. Adding these kinds of tags to your posts helps them filter and better match your posts with the people who will want to engage with that content.

How are you using Facebook Audience Optimization, and have you noticed any difference in engagement as a result?

 

facebook audience optimization