How To (and Why) Build a Linktree Page (Plus Free Templates)

How To (and Why) Build a Linktree Page (Plus Free Templates)

If you’re building your social media platform on Instagram, and haven’t considered using a linktree page for your bio link, then you’re missing some really great opportunities.

Instagram has established itself as one of the top and most influential social networks out there right now. But from the perspective of a content producer (blogger or small business), the big downside is that you cannot put functional links in the content of your posts. You get one active link, and that’s in your bio.

With only one link being available to you, it’s difficult to ensure people are getting to your most important content or whatever you want them to see when you post something in your feed.

That’s where a linktree page comes in.

What Is Linktree Page? (and Why You Should Use One)

A linktree (or bio links) page is a webpage that contains a group of important links that point people to your most important content and resources. They are designed to use in social media bios, especially in places like Instagram, where only one link is allowed (and posts cannot contain links).

In response to this need, services like LINKTR.EE have emerged to make it simple to develop stylish landing pages to use in your social media bios.

linktree

This helps bloggers (and content producers of all kinds) share posts on Instagram about new content. Just mention “link in bio” (or hashtag #linkinbio), and people can click-thru that link to get to the content you want them to see. So where you get one link to point people to, using a landing page like this gets people to where you want them much more efficiently.

Even better, you can integrate other features like newsletter signup, products or services, event details, or other promotions you’re running.

Linktree Alternatives

While LINKTR.EE has a very basic free level of service, the best features (and some very important ones) come in the premium version. And LINKTR.EE is the most popular bio links landing page service currently available.

However, when you’re using tools like this, it’s important to have consistency in how you present your brand. And you may want to add some features not available, especially in the free version. Plus, you may not want their branding all over your stuff. That doesn’t help you build your brand as much.

So if you like the idea of LINKTR.EE, but want to explore other options, then there are several to consider, including:

  • Campsite.Bio – Another freemium service (free and paid versions) that gives you the basic bio link pages for free, with some nice upgrades in the paid version. It provides a simple interface, and the ability to add images in the free version.
  • ContactInBio – Also a freemium service which features full landing page capabilities, which is pretty nice. It also has a lifetime plan so that you can get all of the premium features and not have to pay a recurring fee.
  • Build Your Own – This is a completely free option, leveraging the website you already have in place. Especially with themes like Divi (which is included in our BASIC and above hosting plans), you can build a page that lives on your website with all of the same features. Plus your customization capabilities are unlimited!

The build-your-own approach is by far the best option. It gives you full control over design and how you present your brand. Not to mention that it gets visitors on your website with a page that’s designed to get them to other key content you have (improving on-site engagement metrics, which is good for your SEO).

The Anatomy of a Good Bio Links Page

Especially if you’re going to build your own page, you should understand a few key concepts for how to build it well.

The first rule for your bio links page is to keep it simple. You don’t want to overwhelm people with so much stuff that you end up scaring them away. Remember, the main goal is to just get them to the next step. So focus on the core elements that encourage them to tap through to that important content.

A few key elements you’ll want to consider are:

  • A profile pic (or logo) – This is a key branding element.
  • Your name – Another important core branding piece.
  • Short description (optional) – If you do this, keep it brief. It’s not the place for your full story (like your about page), but definitely good for a brand-building tagline or short description statement.
  • Quick link(s) to recent content – Have a button going to your latest blog post, or even add a blurb from the post itself.
  • High priority links – Use buttons to connect people to key pages on your website, including books, products, etc.
  • Email opt-in – Add a simple opt-in on the page, or use a button to link to it.
  • Social media links – Make it easy to connect in other places you engage with your audience.

linktree, linktree alternative, linktree divi template

To make this process simple for you, we’ve created several templates that you can upload to your website (using WordPress with the Divi theme), and customize from there. Check out the demos of these Linktree-alternative pages, and download your free templates now!

How To Build Your Own Bio Links Page (With Divi)

We’re big fans of the Divi theme (by Elegant Themes) around here. One reason we love it is the portability of page layouts (and other elements). We use it almost exclusively with our clients on all web development projects. So you can download those templates (mentioned above) and load them to your website as a starting point.

Once you import the layouts to your website, you can load them to a new page using the Divi Builder. Follow these instructions:

  1. Add a new page
  2. Click the “Use The Divi Builder” button
  3. Select “Choose a Premade Layout”
  4. Go to the “Your Saved Layouts” tab
  5. Pick the template you’d like to start with

After that, you can edit each module however you’d like.

Basic Layout and Design

The templates use Text modules for each of the buttons on the page. You can change the text that appears on the button, and update the link that it points to.

linktree, linktree divi template

If you’re feeling adventurous, you can even change styles, animations, or any other properties you’d like.

The page background can be updated in the Background settings in Section Settings (click the gear icon on the blue bar). There you can change the background image or colors.

And, as with any other page built in Divi, you can add all kinds of modules to add to your page. It’s still best to keep the page simple, but modules like Email Optin, Countdown Timer, Search, Testimonial, Video, and many others can really help you take your bio links page to the next level.

To ensure the best look, toggle over to the Phone View to see how everything appears. Assuming that you’re using the page for your bio link on Instagram, nearly all of the visitors to the page will likely be coming from mobile devices. So it’s most important for it to look good there. And if you want to adjust for potential desktop viewing, you can do that too. But desktop should definitely take a backseat to mobile in the design and appearance on this page.

Page Attributes Settings

Once you have the page elements in place and are ready to publish the page, there are a few key attributes that will be important to consider. The first of which is the permalink structure. Ultimately, the page name can be whatever you’d like. But simple is best. And visitors on Instagram will see the link name in your bio. While simplicity is the key, feel free to have fun or give it a call-to-action kind of feel. It’s okay to let your personality show. A few examples for permalink page names are:

  • yoursite.com/bio-links
  • yoursite.com/welcome
  • yoursite.com/hi
  • yoursite.com/instagram
  • yoursite.com/as-seen-on
  • yoursite.com/click-me
  • yoursite.com/hello

Also, you’ll need to update a couple of settings in order to ensure everything displays properly. Look for the Page Attributes widget and update the following settings:

  • Parent: (no parent) – Do not make this page a sub-page to another page (like About, etc). That will extend the permalink unnecessarily. Keep this page on the first level (no parent) in order to keep the permalink short.
  • Template: Blank Page – This setting removes all of the normal website headers and footers. Everything you need in the design for these pages is included in the layout itself, so you don’t want to complicate everything with more navigation and other elements.

Whether you’re using the free templates or starting from scratch on your own, you’ll love the flexibility and virtually unlimited design options and control you can get. And hosting all of this on your own website means that you’ll get it all at no additional cost!

How To Use a Bio Links Page In Your Instagram Bio

Once you’ve published the page on your website, it’s time to add it to your Instagram bio. To edit your bio:

  1. Go to your profile
  2. Tap the Edit Profile button next to your current bio
  3. Type (or copy/paste) your page URL (permalink) in the Website field
  4. Tap the Done (or check icon) button

Whenever you make changes like this, it’s always best to visit your profile and tap the link to ensure everything works as it should. But easy-peasy… you’re new Instagram linktree-like bio links page is live! Now you can mention in your posts, “link in bio,” to get visitors to all of the great stuff you want to direct them to.

Other Places You Can Use Your Bio Links Page

While these kinds of bio link pages started with Instagram, you can use them just about anywhere. And if you want to get super cool, you can create separate linktree pages for various platforms. For example, the bio links page you want people to visit coming from your LinkedIn page may look a little different than the one for visitors from Instagram.

Get creative and explore different ways to use pages like these. Here’s a quick list to inspire you:

  • LinkedIn profile – Share links to your portfolio, previous work, email, and social profiles
  • Twitter bio – Connect people to your other social media profiles and important links
  • Business cards – Increase the dynamic with special links and content for people you share your business cards with
  • QR Codes  – Point a QR code on posters and other print advertising to share specials, etc with people
  • Your email signature – Important content to direct people to from your emails
  • Links in your book(s) – Share key resources with readers of your books

The possibilities are really endless. And if you’re doing this on your own website, you can create as many of these specialized pages as you want. So change designs, content, and everything for really just about any audience you can imagine.

Final Thoughts

If you run a content platform (blog, etc) of any kind, then getting your core content in front of people is critical. Linktree certainly brought a level of convenience to highlighting that content in the one link you get for your Instagram bio.

But building your own on your website has a bunch of great benefits. The big goal of digital marketing is always to get people onto your website and have them take some action. Having a well-structured bio links page (or several of them) accomplishes just that. And driving traffic to an engagement-focused page can improve your overall SEO by showing Google that your website is worth engaging with.

Better yet, maintaining full control over the branding and design is an important element for growing your platform online. It’s important to build a presence that people will recognize when they think about you.

So go download the free Linktree Alternative Divi Templates, and get started today! And if you want to get your website on Divi with one of our managed WordPress hosting plans, then we can help you with that too. And let us know if you have any questions or need guidance with any of this. Let’s see what you can create!

 

have i told you about my love–hate relationship with facebook?

have i told you about my love–hate relationship with facebook?

I want to quit.

That’s how I feel about Facebook, every day of my life. I don’t know if I can take another algorithm change. And it seems like the wounds from the last one haven’t even healed yet when another comes along and rips in even more. Sometimes I don’t think I’ll ever recover, and walking away seems to be the best option.

But then I look at the data.

Facebook is one of the top drivers of traffic to my websites, second only to Google. And the quality of the traffic coming from Facebook has been much more engaged than other sources, making it probably the single most valuable referrer of people checking out my work.

So are all the headaches worth it? Well, it depends.

I read somewhere recently that all the algorithm changes aren’t a reason to jump ship right away, that is unless your strategy is a shallow one. The article pointed out that the opportunity is still great for smart marketers.

Challenge accepted.

Here’s the deal…

It’s not about tricking the system or developing elaborate systems to make it do what you want.

facebook, social media tips

The first thing you need to understand

Facebook is about people. It sounds simple, but we quickly forget as we try to focus on numbers for reach, likes, shares, and comments. When we post something, we want it to be seen by as many people as possible. But the second we start thinking about numbers, we start to lose sight of people.

Many feel like Facebook’s attempts to limit the visibility of brand page content is merely an attempt to force people to pay for views. While there may be an element of truth to that, think about what your news feed would look like if brands weren’t limited in any way. It would be overflowing with “commercials” from brands trying to get you to buy something. And I don’t know anyone who gets on Facebook to sort through a steady stream of advertising hell. And Facebook is more likely to keep people on the platform when it can keep the focus on people.

People.

That’s what we want to see when we sign onto Facebook. So next time you sign in and can see your in-laws’ awesome vacation photos, thank Facebook for changing their algorithms. Okay, so maybe that wasn’t the best example, but I’m sure you get what I mean. #fistbump

Personal Profiles vs. Brand Page (Which is right for me?)

No lie. This is one of the most frequently asked questions I get when I talk to people about social media. With all of the talk about Facebook pushing down the reach of pages (unless you pay-to-play), it’s difficult to see a brand page adding value. At the same time, many book publishers look for fan page numbers as evidence of an author’s platform. Ultimately, a brand page can add value… as long as you understand it’s strengths and limitations. But the greatest traction you get on Facebook will come when you post to your personal profile.

I recently did an informal study of engagement on some brand pages. One of the pages I looked at is an author page belonging to a popular New York Times Best Seller. Averaging 1,383 likes per post, there’s enough engagement to make the best of us covet our neighbor’s social media platform. But then consider that this person’s page has over 146,000 followers. The average engagement rate turns out to be only 0.9% of the total fan base. And that’s actually a good rate of engagement!

Remember, the platform is about people. So any successful strategy should be centered on how you use your personal profile to get the better reach.

In another informal study, I’ve posted new content to my brand pages and watched the rate of engagement for the first few hours. Often my efforts make me feel like I’m watching the proverbial pot of water waiting to boil. But after a period of low organic engagement on the page post, I’ll share the post from the page onto my personal profile. Usually within minutes I see 5-10 times the engagement. The point is that IF you decide to use a brand page, it’s re-sharing your content to your personal profile that will drive the greatest organic reach. And if you can get a few other people to share it as well, then your organic reach expands exponentially.

I think it speaks volumes that Facebook’s founder, Mark Zuckerberg, doesn’t post to a brand page. Instead, he allows people to subscribe to his personal profile (where he has over 27 million followers), and posts everything there (some posts only to friends, and others to the public for all followers). #justsayin

Tools to help you maximize your impact

I always, always, always advise people to follow the data. Don’t base decisions for how to manage your Facebook presence on emotion, feelings, what someone said works for them, and what some “guru” said you should do. Even if it worked for someone else, it doesn’t mean that it’ll work for you.

One of the strengths of brand pages is the Insights tool. It’ll give you a wealth of information about your audience, and how they’re engaging (or not engaging) with your content. You can even find out when your fans are online (which should give you a good idea of when to post). So it’s a good idea to review your page Insights on a regular basis (maybe once every week or two), and ask yourself how you think you need to revise your strategy based on what you’re seeing there.

Unfortunately, personal profiles don’t have the same Insights tools. That’s why I like to use a tool like Buffer to post content that I want to measure. Buffer uses special tracking measures that give us better insight into what’s working and what’s not. In addition to that, it makes it easy to schedule content for specific and/or set times which help you take advantage of waves and cycles of visibility.

Last thought…

Facebook presents us with a tremendous opportunity to engage and connect with people, and to share ideas. And when it comes to building your brand on Facebook, you should stop thinking like a brand, and focus on thinking like a person.

 

Note: This post was originally published on the Allume Blog.

how to share your blog posts on social media like a boss

how to share your blog posts on social media like a boss

share blog postsIf blogging had a secret sauce or magic potion, this would be it. By far, this is the most common question I get asked about blogging and social media.

When is right time to share blog posts on social media?

I can confidently respond without hesitation…

It depends.

I’ll be honest. I really wish I could tell you an exact formula for sharing your (amazing) blog posts so they reach the millions of people who need to be reading them. But the reality is that there isn’t a formula.

With that said, there are some things you can do that’ll help you figure it out. With a little bit of testing, measuring, and retesting, you’ll find the right answer for you pretty quickly. In no time at all, you’ll be able to share blog posts like a boss.

The First Key to Social Media Success

It’s not about you.

First and foremost, the success of your blog posts in the world of social media has nothing to do with you. Well, maybe a little bit. Many bloggers misunderstand social media success as having to do with getting the right mix with when and how they post their content. However, if it only depended on your sharing, then it’s not really social, is it?

If you want to find success in social media, then you need to be thinking about how other people share your content. Your role in that is two-fold:

  1. Create content that’s share-worthy. Think about blog post titles that make readers want to click. Think about eye-popping images that catch their attention. Think about writing content that would make them want to share with their friends because of how it moved them.
  2. Make it easy for them to share. I’m amazed at how many websites I visit where I can’t find social sharing buttons. Sure, I could copy/paste the blog post URL, but if I have to go to that much effort, you’ve already lost me. Share buttons should be highly visible and easy to use.

Finding the Right Times

While most of your success comes from how other people share your content, you’ll still want to optimize how you share your blog posts for maximum reach. This is where you’ll want to experiment with different types of posts (text, images, links, and videos) at different times of the day.

Social media gurus will look at the data and tell you that you should be posting your content at 2pm on Thursday afternoons (or some other flavor of the month). However, that’s based on meta-data from thousands of accounts, not your data.

So how do you find the optimum times for your accounts?

For Facebook

If you run a Facebook page for your website, then you’ll have access to Insights for your page.

facebook-insights

In your Insights, you’ll find “When Your Fans Are Online” on the Posts tab. The initial chart shows general population volume, but when you mouse over different days of the week you’ll see when your fans are online that day. This is based on recent data specific to the people who are fans of your page. Note that when your followers are online will vary from day to day.

facebook, best time to post

For Twitter

You can find similar data for Twitter using third-party tools, like Follwerwonk. Once you sign in with your Twitter account, you’ll be able to analyze followers… both those who follow you, and those who you follow. You’ll get a great deal of demographic information about your followers, and a detailed chart of when they are most active on Twitter.

twitter, analyze followers

I want to draw special attention to that “Schedule at Buffer” button below the top chart. That brings me to my next point…

Buffering Your Way to Success

Once you’ve figured out the best times to schedule your posts, then you can plug that information into a tool like Buffer. In Buffer, you’ll be able to create a custom schedule for each of your social media profiles and set the times you want to post. You can even schedule different frequency and posting times for each day of the week. In the example below, you’ll see that I set my schedule to reflect the peak times for my Facebook page on Tuesdays.

buffer, scheduling posts

This is where that “Schedule at Buffer” button in Followerwonk comes in handy. You can select a frequency for scheduled posts in a day, and automatically import an optimum posting schedule into Buffer.

One of my favorite parts of Buffer is the analytics for the posts you share (only through Buffer). Based on interaction thresholds, you’ll get a good idea of what kinds of social media posts are resonating the most with your audience.

buffer analytics

It’s important to note here that using Buffer for scheduled posts doesn’t mean that everything you do on social media needs to be scheduled through Buffer. It is, however, a great tool that will help you push your blog posts out to different platforms at predetermined times, making sharing much simpler.

CoSchedule: A Premium Solution

If your blog is on (self-hosted) WordPress, then you can use some cool tools like CoSchedule. This WordPress plugin comes with a small monthly fee, but it has some pretty slick scheduling functionality. Basically, while you in your Edit Post mode, you can also create your social media posts to publish at whatever times you specify. Create, text, image, and link posts to run at the same time that your blog posts publishes. And then run a different kind of social media post at x-number of hours after the blog post publishes.

If you publish your blog post at 6am, you can publish a link post to Facebook at 6am, then an image post 5 hours later, and a text post 10 hours later. Then think about the Twitter and Google+ posts you want to send out in order to get the best coverage for when your followers are most likely to see it. Everything is triggered automatically based on the publishing of the blog post. CoSchedule even has a slick calendar that shows you all scheduled blog and social media posts for easy management.

Last thought…

The best thing you can do to determine what social media posting methods and schedules are best for you is to test, measure, adjust and test again. When you share blog posts, pay attention to the types of social media posts you run at different times, and how well each of those resonates with your followers. Before long, you should be able to pick up on some trends and patterns with your followers that will help you optimize every post you make…

Like a boss.

 

Note: This post was originally published on the Allume Blog.

4 Things to Do with Every Blog Post for Social Media Exposure

4 Things to Do with Every Blog Post for Social Media Exposure

social media, blog post, blogging tips

Most people believe that increasing social media exposure is all about getting more followers.That’s not entirely true. Certainly, building your own social media following is important, but consider this question…

I regularly tell clients that it’s more important to enable and get other people to share your content than it is to build a massive following yourself. In fact, your social media following will inevitably grow if you are effectively getting other people to share your stuff.

And before I get into the practices I suggest for social sharing, it’s worth stating that the first thing you need to do is to create something worth sharing. Your content must be strong if you expect other people to put in front of the people they know. It shouldn’t be something that only tells your story, but also connects with their story. The more people can relate to your experience and say resoundingly, “Yes! That’s me too!”, the more likely they are to share across their networks.

With that said, here are four things I suggest you do with every post in order to maximize your social media exposure:

1. Rock your social media sharing buttons

The first thing you should be thinking about is how you make social sharing easy for your readers. Typically, every action you require a visitor on your website to take in order to accomplish something, the more likely they are to drop off somewhere in the process. Several studies have shown that social like/share buttons at the top of a post get more clicks than the ones at the bottom of a post. Some visitors will visit the page, and because they like you and or your topic in general, they’ll click that button before even reading the rest of the post (an extra action required in order to get to the same buttons at the bottom of the page).

Using the same thinking, floating sidebar buttons tend to get more engagement because they’re always visible, no matter where the reader is. So whenever they decide they like it, and the urge hits them to share, they don’t need to go anywhere else to find how to share. The option is simply always there.

With your social sharing options, you’ll want to make sure you’re offering sharing options for most popular networks, even if you aren’t on them. The idea of social sharing is more about enabling people to share where they want, not just where you are. Think about who your typical reader is, and where they may have profiles.

There are several great plugins for implementing a floating sidebar for social sharing, and our favorite is Monarch from Elegant Themes. The reason we like this one so much is because of the flexibility in design, and the built-in sharing metrics.

2. Use a social media friendly image

What I’m talking about here is more than simply having a nice-looking image on your post. Instead, think about your images as an additional stand-alone piece of micro-content. Create quote images or other stylized images that people will want to share. Think about whether an image has value outside your post if someone were to see it on Pinterest, for example. Ideally, once it’s shared by someone to Pinterest (or anywhere else), it’ll be linked back to your website. But the image can take on a life of its own if it is good content by itself, reaching far more people that you might expect.

Use tools like PicMonkey or Canva to create amazing graphics to share on your posts. And every post should have an image. No exceptions.

Additionally, whether you are on Pinterest or not, you should be using a plugin which will place a Pin It! button on your images, making it easier for your readers to share that piece of content. There are several good ones out there, like this one…

social media

3. Use click-to-tweets in your post

Another piece of micro-content which should be included in every post is pre-made tweets. These click-to-tweets empower your readers to share key ideas from your posts with a single click. Additionally, when you use a plugin like Click To Tweet (linked below), it also creates a nice visual break in your content, making it easier for your reader to scan for key ideas.

So think about what might be some of the biggest, most important ideas from your post, and turn those into click-to-tweets. Having other people sharing tidbits of your wisdom is a great way to establish greater credibility regarding the topic you write about. And having it ready for them means fewer steps to share those ideas (again, making it more likely that it will get shared).

social media

4. Schedule your own social media posts

Every blogger also knows that once you publish a post, you should be sharing it on your own social media. However, many bloggers share once, hoping that everyone who needs to see that post will see it. The reality is that social media posts have a limited lifespan. So having a strategy for sharing your own content multiple times can increase your chances of people seeing it. Kissmetrics suggests a schedule for sharing your content that looks something like this:

  • Twitter: On publish, two hours later, next day, next week, next month, and two months later
  • Facebook: On publish, and next month
  • Google+: On publish, next week, and next month

You can play around with these timings, and if you use a tool like Buffer, then you can easily schedule all of these all at once, and monitor the metrics for how each post is performing with clicks-thrus back to your website. Additionally, Kissmetrics suggests mixing up your posts so they don’t all look the same. Your mix should contain variations such as these:

  • Straight and Easy: Post Title + Link
  • The Question: Ask an engaging question to stir conversation
  • Cite a Fact: Share a fact or figure that is included in your post
  • Share a Quote: Grab a pull-quote from your article and turn it into a social message
  • Add Intrigue: Write a teaser message that grabs the attention of your readers

Once you find a posting schedule that works for you with the networks you are on, and enable others to share your content (and micro-content) on a regular basis, then you’ll be well on your way to maximizing your social reach with every post.

 

Photo by Sarah Joy, used via Creative Commons from Flickr. Image design by Fistbump Media, LLC.

thoughts on being a resource (and a blog party)

thoughts on being a resource (and a blog party)

“Remember this. Hold on to this. This is the only perfection there is, the perfection of helping others. This is the only thing we can do that has any lasting meaning. This is why we’re here. To make each other feel safe.”

― Andre Agassi

I just jumped in blindly when I started blogging seven years ago. I had experience with web development and writing training programs, but the fine art of writing for readers was a new experience for me. I knew nothing about finding (and keeping) an audience captive and growing a platform as a (real) writer.

There was a great deal of networking and studying the craft and technology of blogging that I had to get done. As a result, I owe practically everything I know about blogging to someone else somewhere along the way.

Even today, as blogging continues to evolve, I continue to find myself studying, testing, and experimenting with new tools and tactics.

Over the years, I’ve published somewhere around half a million words of content on the blog, two books (with half a dozen more in development now), and countless social media posts that communicate a message that I never find myself at a loss of words to talk about. And, I couldn’t be more grateful for all of the people who have helped me get to where I am today.

So when I started Fistbump Media in the last year, one of the most important ideals I wanted to drive what we’re all about is this concept of being helpful… being a resource for others who are trying to do the same things that I’ve been able to accomplish.

That’s why we do free webinars and Q+A sessions. That’s why I answer questions and help others, even if it means that I don’t get paid for it sometimes.

We believe it’s important that we (as a community of bloggers) support each other, and help each other reach our goals.

 

As it turns out, this position of simply being helpful has helped us create some very positive buzz about what we do. My heart honestly skips a beat every time I see another message come through from someone who learned something in one of our events and improved their blogging platform!

We also believe that these success stories can be encouraging to others who are going through the same thing. So we’ve asked some of the people who we’ve helped to share a little bit about how they’ve experienced growth/success on their blogs. I hope that these experiences encourage you to take the next step with your blogging, and encourage you that together we can grow and sharpen our skills.

If you’ve learned and applied something as a result of a Fistbump Media event, then please share your success stories here! And if you haven’t, then I hope you find strength and encouragement in these stories. You can do it too!

#fistbump



is photography dead? [INFOGRAPHIC]

is photography dead? [INFOGRAPHIC]

I’ve done quite a bit of traveling outside the country over the last few years. And you’d say that I was a fool if I told you that I didn’t have a camera on me for any of those trips. Could you image being 10 yards away from a real, live lion in the wild in Africa and not getting a picture of it?

However, I left the camera at home on my most recent trip to Haiti. Why? Mobile photography. (more…)